The Poet X Book Pdf ePub

The Poet X

by
4.406,452 votes • 1,480 reviews
Published 06 Mar 2018
The Poet X.pdf
Format Kindle Edition
Pages368
Edition11
Publisher HarperTeen
ISBN -
ISBN13-
Languageunknow



A young girl in Harlem discovers slam poetry as a way to understand her mother’s religion and her own relationship to the world. Debut novel of renowned slam poet Elizabeth Acevedo.
Xiomara Batista feels unheard and unable to hide in her Harlem neighborhood. Ever since her body grew into curves, she has learned to let her fists and her fierceness do the talking.
But Xiomara has plenty she wants to say, and she pours all her frustration and passion onto the pages of a leather notebook, reciting the words to herself like prayers—especially after she catches feelings for a boy in her bio class named Aman, who her family can never know about. With Mami’s determination to force her daughter to obey the laws of the church, Xiomara understands that her thoughts are best kept to herself.
So when she is invited to join her school’s slam poetry club, she doesn’t know how she could ever attend without her mami finding out, much less speak her words out loud. But still, she can’t stop thinking about performing her poems.
Because in the face of a world that may not want to hear her, Xiomara refuses to be silent.

"The Poet X" Reviews

Cyn (semi-hiatus)
5
Thu, 29 Mar 2018

I'm still not over this. I keep re-reading some passages. Slam poetry means a lot to me! *cries for 5 more years*
A touching story about a young Hispanic woman growing up in Harlem with a very devout mother. But there is so much more to it than that <3
I couldn't say enough about this book if I tried - I just adore it to pieces. I'm extremely glad this came in my PageHabit YA box for March, the comments from the author make the experience exponentially better (as if it wasn't fantastic already :P ) <3 <3
--------
I. GOT. THIS. LETS. DO. THIS.

Tomi
5
Fri, 26 Jan 2018

#ThePoetX was so beautiful that I didn’t want to highlight it or dog ear pages, so I just took pictures basically every page
This was the type of book where “I’ll just do 50 pages” turned into finishing it in 2 reads
I felt very emotional reading this book, not just because the story and the words themselves were so beautiful, but because I knew it was going to make so many teens who felt like no one cares about them or listens to them feel seen.
I also knew that if I had had books like this or Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds as a kid, I wouldn’t have taken me until the age of 17 to realize I loved reading and writing
Can’t say enough good things about these books, everyone should pre-order and read it! It’s out 3/6/18!!

Laura
3
Thu, 29 Jun 2017

When I’m told to have faith in the father, the son, in men - and men are the first ones to make me feel so small.

The Poet X is not only a book about a girl discovering her love of poetry. It's about a young dominican girl, Xiomara, living in Harlem. She has a curvy figure that draws unwanted attention from men and boys. Her mother blames her for this. She is taught to cover up. She is torn when she finds herself liking a boy going against everything she's been taught. Is she sinning? Her mother is very religious and wants very badly for her daughter to go to get confirmed. Little does her mother know, but Xiomara has been questioning religion. Only able to express her true self on the page, she shares her thoughts and questions through poetry in a notebook her twin brother gifted her.
I found this to be an incredibly important book due to the subject matter. I found myself nodding along in regard to Xiomara and the unwanted attention she would receive from men. I think any female knows what this is like having been a teenage girl at one point. It's creepy. There's no other word for it. And it'd odd because you're just now being considered a woman and want to be desired (by boys your own age) but you don't expect these lines to be crossed yet the things said and done. It's disgusting. And then when it comes to the overly-strict parents, this is why Xiomara needs to express herself on the page. She doesn't feel she can be honest about her thoughts and feelings with fear of repercussion. Not to mention her twin brother who has his own secret he can't tell.
The religion plot line is a fascinating one as well. There aren't many YA novels that get into the topic of religion. I thought it was done wonderfully here. The questions Xiomara has are legit. I don't like getting into religion due to how controversial a topic it can be, but I appreciated that an important discussion on religion is had here and I applaud it.
I wish the book hadn't had so many slower moments. And sometimes the romance was too much. I understand Xiomara was exploring her own sexuality through that plot line. I just personally didn't care because I don't prefer romance. The poetry format was perfect for the story. It incorporated Xiomara's love and discovery of poetry in with the other storylines even when slam poetry wasn't at the forefront.
This was an important, relatable coming-of-age story told in poetry form.

Laurie
5
Thu, 15 Mar 2018

A story that will slam the power of poetry and love back into your heart!! Highly recommended!

Kate (GirlReading)
- The United Kingdom
5
Fri, 27 Apr 2018

This was absolutely stunning. I absolutely adored the way Elizabeth Acevedo writes. It was incredibly powerful and honest and the characters she created were so personable, especially Xiomara. I found myself rooting for her from the first page onwards and essentially finished this book in one sitting, it was far too addictive and moving to put down. I’ve not read many books written in verse but it was by far my favourite. The story flowed flawlessly and was so easy to follow and connect to. There were so many elements I adored, from the way Xiomara’s draft and final assignments seemed to portray what she was actually thinking and feeling and wanted to write vs. what she felt she had to write, to the brilliant narrative in which Xiomara questions and attempts to take charge of where she stands in terms of her and her families religious beliefs. There wasn’t a page of this book that wasn’t powerful and lyrical and I’m so incredibly excited to see what Elizabeth Acevedo has in store for her next book because, if this was anything to go by, I’m sure it will be utterly stunning.